International Studies 385

Environment as a Social and Political Movement in

Pre-and-post Cold War

Monday 1:30-4:20 p.m.

Spring 1999

Instructor: Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo

Office Hours:

Monday: 11:00a.m.-12:00 noon

Tuesday and Thursday: 2:00 00-4:45 p.m.

Cleveland 108

Telephone 364-3220

Required Books

-Ronnie D. Lipschutz and Ken Conga, (Editors). The State and Social Power in Global Environmental Politics, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

-Bron Raymond Taylor (editor). Ecological Resistance Movements: The Global Emergence of Radical and Popular Environmentalism, New York, Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995.

-Paul Wapner, Environmental Activism and World Civic Politics, New York: Albany, State University of New York, 1996.

-Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo, "Reflections on EcoCity Systems: Historic and Theoretic Perspectives," in Richard Register and Brady Peeks (eds) Village Wisdom: the Future Cities, Hayward, CA: Alonzo Press, 1997 (On reserve in the Library)

Course Description

Environmental questions are essentially social and political as they are articulated by citizens, social groups, states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and private corporations within the framework of their own particular interests and power base. In this seminar, we will examine how various social groups, political parties, communityís organizations, and states have dealt with environmental issues during and after the Cold War era. The focus will be on how various social groups have organized themselves in dealing with the environmental crisis and on the nature of the discourses they have produced at different levels of societal and professional hierarchies. One of our objectives is to be able to identify and analyse the relationship between the environment, the market and its agents, global politics and its actors, and the global capitalism.

Requirements

-Studentís active participation in all discussions of the seminar (10% of the total grade).

-A late work and any absence without any justification will be penalized.
 
 

-The first paper

Student will write a critical book review on Paul Wapnerís book entitled: Environmental Activism and World Civic Politics, New York: Albany, State University of New York, 1996. This review is 5 pages, typed, double space. It is due on March 8. (20 % of the total grade)

-The second paper

Student will write a summary of the major arguments developed in chapters 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 12) in Ronnie D. Lipschutz and Ken Conga, (Editors). The State and Social Power in Global Environmental Politics, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993. This summary should be between 7 and 8 pages, typed, double space. The paper is due on April 5. (20 % of the total grade).

-The Presentation

-Every students will make a class presentation of between 20 and 25 minutes on a topic chosen by student in collaboration with the instructor. The assignment gives students an opportunity to develop or expand on some issues that students have particular or special interests. They can choose any topic that relates to those of this seminar that we did not have any chance to develop or fully explore. The presentation will start on May 3. ( 20% of the total grade).

-The final paper should focus on one of the following issues: development and ecology, environment and peace, environment and health, population and preservation of the environment, race, culture and the environment, democracy and the environmental change, corporations and the environment, democratic representations and decisions on the environment. The combination of those issues is also acceptable. The issue(s) must be analyzed from a concrete case study perspective. (30% of the total grade). The final paper of between 15 and 17 pages typed double space is due on May 12.

Schedule

-1/ 25. A general introduction of the course: requirements, issues, expectations, studentsí interests and their backgrounds, and a discussion on my paper presented at the Conference on the Ecovillage and Ecocity in Dakar, Senegal in January 1995.

-2/1. Environment in a World of states

The State and Social Power, pp. 19-23. and pp. 69-93.

-2/8. World Civic Politics and Environmental challenges

Environmental Activism, pp.1-40.

-2/15. Greenpeace and Global politics

Ecological Resistance, chapter 16 and Environmental Activism,chapter 3

-2/22. Earth First and Liberty

Ecological Resistance, chapters 1 and 2.

-3/1. Women, Moral and Political rights and Environmental issues in South America

Ecological Resistance, chapter 3 and 4. (No class the instructor will be attending a conference and the discussion is scheduled for 4/12).

3/8. Grassroots environmental Resistance in India and the Philippines,

Ecological Resistance, chapters 7 and 8.

-3/15. Selected Cases of Popular Resistance Movements in Europe:

Norway, Britain, and Scotland,

Ecological Resistance, chapters 11, 12 and 13.

March 20-28, 1999-Spring Holiday

-3/29. Grassroots environmental Resistance in Africa,

Ecological Resistance, chapters 9 and 10.

-4/5. Discussion on the film: "South Africa: the Wasted land."

-4/12. Women, Moral and Political rights and Environmental issues in South America

Ecological Resistance, chapter 3 and 4.

4/19. Film on One Earth and Discussion

-4/26 and 5/3-Class Presentations

The final paper is due on May 12 at noon.
 
 
 
 
 
Home
Biography and Research Projects
Course List and Suggested Reading
Links
Email the Professor



This page belongs to Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo, who is solely responsible for its content. Information on Web pages maintained by individuals reflects their own ideas; it does not implicitly or explicitly represent official positions and policies of Wells College. Wells College claims no editorial control over material maintained by individual faculty, staff and students. The owner of the page assumes responsibility and liability for the content of his or her documents.