Wells College
Political Science 262
Government and Politics in Developing Countries
Spring 2000

Instructor: Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo
Cleveland 108
Office Hours:
Monday: 11:00-12:00
Thursday:  2:00-5:00
 

Required Texts

Abdo Boaklini, Guilain Denoeux, and Robert Springbord (Eds), Legislative Politics in the Arab World: The Resurgence of Democratic Institutions, Lynne Rienner, 1999.

Larry Diamond, Juan J. Linz, and Martin Lipset (Eds.) Politics of Developing Countries: Comparing Experiences with Democracy, Lynne Rienner, 1995.

Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo, The Rise of Multipartyism and Democracy in the Context of Global Change: The Case of Africa, Praeger, 1998.

Ruth Roded (ed.), Women in Islam and the Middle East, St. Martin, 1998.

Andreas Schedler, Larry Diamond and Marc F. Plattner, The Self-Restraining State: Power and Accountability in New Democracies, Lynne Rienner, 1999.
 

Course Description

Do developing countries have any common or similar institutional and behavioral characteristics in terms of the state apparatuses and their structures, and the relations between the state and the society? What forms of government were more dominant in most of developing world in the 20th century?

The main objective of this course is to understand the dynamics of politics and governments in developing countries using both historical and comparative approaches with a particular focus on liberal democracy.

In one aspect of the course, we will define the concepts of developing countries. Another aspect will examine the history of political formations, the nature of the political institutions, the notions of accountability and legitimacy, the role of the executive, judiciary, and legislative powers, behaviors of political actors including, governments, leaders, masses of people, political parties and other organizations, and social movements. Another aspect of the course will also study how factors such as economics, religion, language, and ideology influence the systems of governance, and how the decisions are made within those systems. The question of what kinds of democracies have emerged in developing countries is a central issue in this class, as it has become a global analytical and functional factor in the post-Cold War politics. Some case studies as well as a regional approach will be used in this course.

The course will be run and organized in a lecture format but a high level of students’ participation is expected.
 

Requirements

(1) Based on readings and the issues raised from lectures, an active participation in the discussion is highly required.  It counts for 10% of the total grade.

(2) Any unjustified absence will be penalized. The penalty will be reflected on the final grade. The following policy on the unjustified absence will be applied:
For two absences, 15 points will be deducted from the total grade;
For three and four absences, 25 points will be deducted from the total grade;
For five absences, 35 points will deducted from the total grade; and
For 6 or more absences students will lose the entire grade for this course.

(3) A midterm exam will count for 20% of the total grade; it will be on March 16, 2000.

(4) Two papers will count each for 20% of the total grade;

(5) And the final exam will count for 30% of the total grade. It will be on May 16 at 8:15 A.M.
 

Written Assignments

Students will write two papers on:

(1) “An Analysis of the politics of parliamentary or representative governmental systems in two countries. These countries should be located either in Africa, Asia, or South America (Latin America). They should not be in the same continent. In your research, make sure to deal with how those parliaments were formed, what their structures are, and how they were or are functioning. You may choose any period in the development of the selected countries. The paper is due on Tuesday, March 7 at 5:00 P.M.

(2) “The role of women in politics in developing countries.” You may choose to deal with one of the following sub-topics:

(a) Women as the leaders of the political parties, governments, heads of government, or other social organizations than political parties; What have been their perceptions of politics and state, and their styles of governance and management of political affairs?

(b) Rural women and how they have influenced state, politics, and democratic processes or institutions;

(c) And Women in state formation and/or in liberation struggles or movements.

The second paper is due on Tuesday, April 18 at 5:00 P.M.

Nota Bene. Whatever aspects are selected for the papers, you have to make sure to use a comparative approach. The length of each paper is between 7 and 9 pages typed and double-spaced including references/bibliography. Each paper must have at least 5 or more references.

SCHEDULE:

2/1-Introduction; Requirements, Issues, and Texts

2/3-Concepts, Definitions, and Factors in Major Paradigms of Developing Countries
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 1.

2/8-Conceptual and Normative Issues
The Self-Retraining State, part one, chapters 2 and 3.

2/10- Discussion on Conceptual and Normative Issues, continues
The Self-Restraining State, chapters 2 and 3.

2/15- Women and Islam
Women in Islam, part one, chapters, 1, 2, and 3.

2/17- Ownership, Equality, and Governance in Islam
Women in Islam, part one, chapter 4 and part 3, chapters 7, 8, and 9.

2/21- Discussion on the Arab Political Institutions and Transition to Democracy
Legislative Politics in the Arab World part one, chapters 1, 2, 3, and 4.

2/24- The Arab Political Institutions and Transition to Democracy, continues
Legislative Politics in the Arab World, part one, chapters 1, 2, 3, and 4.

2/29-The Nature of the Chilean Politics and Democracy,
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 2.

3/2- Building a Nation in Brazil: Structure of the State and the Nature of the Society
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 3.

3/7- Building a Nation in Brazil: Structure of the State and the Nature of the Society, continues
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 3.

3/9-India, State Formation, Democracy, and Development
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 6.

3/14- Thailand, Political Institutions, and Economic Development
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 7.

3/16- Midterm Exam

3/28-Political Development in South Korea
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 8.

3/30- South Korea
Film: “Mini Dragons” (54 minutes)

4/4- Parliament and Democracy in a war zone: the Case of Lebanon
Legislative Politics in the Arab World, chapter 5.

4/6-Institutional Building: the Case of the Judicial Reforms The Cases of South America, Africa and Eastern Europe, The
Self-Retraining State, chapters 10, 11, and 12.

4/11-Discussion on Institutional Building: the Case of the Judicial Reforms continues The Cases of South America, Africa, and Eastern Europe,
The Self-Retraining State, chapters 10, 11, and 12.

4/13-Parliamentary Politics: The Case of Morocco
Legislative Politics in the Arab World, chapter 6.

4/18-Parliamentary Politics: The Case of Kuwait
Legislative Politics in the Arab World, chapter 8.

4/20- Parliamentary Politics: The Case of Egypt
Legislative Politics in the Arab World, chapter 10.

4/25-The Corruption Factor in Governance, Democracy, and Development
The Self-Retraining State, chapters 14 and 15.

4/27- Arguments of Feminist movement in the Arab World
Women in Islam, part 5, chapter 20.

5/2- State, Society, Development, and Democratic Discourse: The Case of Senegal
Politics in Developing Countries, chapter 10.

5/4- Democratic Discourse in Africa: Its Nature and the Role of the Opposition
The Rise of Multipartyism and Democracy, chapters 1 and 2.

5/9-Democratic Discourse in Africa: The Role of the Church
The Rise of Multipartyism and Democracy, chapter 4.

5/11- Democratic Discourse in Africa: The Military and Ethnic Factors
The Rise of Multipartyism and Democracy,
 
 
 
 
 
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