Wells College
Political Science 355
Approaches to International Relations
Fall 2000

Instructor:  Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo
Cleveland 108
Telephone: 364-3220
Offices Hours: Monday 11:00-12:00p.m.
  Tuesday 2:00-4:30p.m.
  Thursday 2:00-4:30p.m.

Required Books:

Evan Luard, Basic Texts in International Relations, NY: St. Martinís Press, 1994.

Tukumbi Lumumba-Kasongo, The Dynamics of Political and Economic Relations between Africa and the Foreign Powers: A Study in International Relations, CT: Praeger, 1998.

Jill Steams, Gender and International Relations, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1998.

Course Description:

What are the historical and philosophical foundations of the contemporary interactions among the states?  Why do states and their institutions behave the way they do? This seminar deals with theories and the dominant approaches to international relations and their philosophical foundation as articulated by some well-read scholars, specialists in international relations.  We will examine the nature of the states as the major actors in international relations, gender issue in international relations, the nature of the structures of international relations, major themes and paradigms in the sub-field of international relations.

Requirements:

* Attendance and active participation in all the discussions of the seminar are required. They will count for 15% of the total grade.

* There will be a mid-term paper; it will count for 30% of the total grade. The topic of the paper is:

Write a critical essay in which you compare the perceptions and the definitions of international politics of John F. Kennedy, Indira Ghandi, and Mao Zedong. The paper has to define the national and international contexts in which each political leader and figure articulated his/her ideas.

In this essay, students have to identify the approaches used by the three leaders, the differences and agreements among them, if any.  The length of the paper is between 13 and 15 pages, typed double and spaced.  The paper is due on October 12. 2000.

There will be a class presentation. Each student is free to choose any topic in international relations that she is interested in.  However, this topic should be either on theory of international relations, empirical issues of international relations or on the behavior of international systems.  Before starting to do research on the topic, student will have to meet with me to discuss the relevance of this topic. Two or more students will not be allowed to work on the same topic.  The presentation will be made between 15 and 20 minutes.  It will be on December 4, 2000.

*  A two-page summary including the complete bibliography is due at the time of presentation.  It will count for 20% of the total grade.
 

* The final paper is due on December 11, 2000.  Each student is free to choose any topic that is not fully dealt with in our discussions.  The length of the paper is between 16 and 18 pages, typed and double-spaced.  This paper will count for 35% of the total grade.

Schedule:

August 28: General introduction and discussion on interests and competitiveness of the state
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2, chapters 10 and 11.

September 4: Interests and Competitiveness of the states
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2,chapters 10 and 11.

September 11: Duties and Reasons of the State
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2, chapters 12 and 13.

September 18: Nationhood and Interventionism
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2, chapters 14 and 15.

September 25: Imperialism and Geography
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2, chapters 16 and 17.

October 2: Stateís Interest and Search for Peace
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2, chapters 18 and 19.

Fall Break: October 7-10

October 16: State and Power (Students will write a one-page summary of the main arguments at the chapter. There will not be any class because the Instructor will be participating in a lecture series in Case Western Reserve University)
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2, chapter 20.

October 23: The Defence of the State
 Luard, Basic Texts, part 2, chapter 23.

October 30: Gender, Feminism, and International Relations
Stearns, Gender and International Relations, New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1998, chapter 1

November 6: Feminist Perspective on Security
Stearns, Gender and International Relations, New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1998, chapter 5.

November 20: Reflections on International Relations between the Industrialized Countries  and the Developing World: a case study
 Lumumba-Kasongo, The Dynamics of Economic and Political Relations  Between Africa and Foreign Powers, CT: Westport: The Praeger, 1998, First section

Thanksgiving Break: November 22-26

November 27: Reflections on International Relations After the end of the Cold War Era: General Trends, Reconstructions and Resistances
Lumumba-Kasongo, The Dynamics of Economic and Political Relations Between Africa and Foreign Powers, CT, Westport: The Praeger, 1998, Last section and Stearns, Gender and International Relations, New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1998, chapter 7.

December 4: Class Presentations
 
 
 
 
 
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